Tuesday, May 21, 2024

Replies: shock pylons

J Bindi

Thank you all for your responses to the following:
I have a patient who has worn the Seattle Air Stance shock, but has = blown the seal a couple of times. He’s a skiier and otherwise very = active. He has tested the TruStep foot and likes that for the = dorsiflexion it affords him while skiing. He would like to try another = type of shock and use it with the TruStep foot (so ReFlex VSP and = Pathfinder are out). I haven’t used many shock pylons. I would welcome = any recommendations and the reasons you like one over another. =20

Replies:

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Try using an endolite TT pylon they are very durable.
I have 2 guys using this pylon that are both 220+ lbs and active. I have = yet had to service them in over a year. You can also talk to Malcolm at = endolite if you want to fine tune the bumpers. He has done some special work in = the past for me with their multiaxial ankles.

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I prefer the Total Shock. I have found that with the increased surface = area for the piston gives you increased durability for your active = patients. TT pylons seem to wear through in to the pylon rather quickly

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try the Century twenty two system, I had a used one apart and liked what I saw. You have a urethane bumper that appears durable, occasional lubrication is all the maintenance I see necessary. I have heard alot of problems associated with the TEC systems so I would = not suggest trying one as of yet.

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We don’t often answer list-server queries, but as we fit = all of the Australian Paralympic skiing team, thought we may assist.

We’ve fitted the Total Shock to a number of our skiers over the years, amongst other shocks. The reason we principally fit the Total Shock is firstly because of the simple adjustability of the torsion & axial compression bumpers, secondly because of the large bearing surface = (unlike the Blatchford TT), thirdly because of its maintenance simplicity (such = as Air-stance), fourthly because of weight and fifthly because temperature = does not alter the function (ala pneumatic/hydraulic shocks).

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The TT pylon from Endolite is a good product and worth a try. Another suggestion is one I have heard of but have not had the opportunity to = try yet. It will require some mechanical ability on the part of your = patient or a quick disconnect unit. The idea is to use an Endolite ankle. The = ankle allows plantarflexion but has a flange on the anterior side to prevent dorsiflexion. The novel approach is to reverse the ankle ONLY for use = in a ski boot. A ski boot requires the ankle be dorsiflexed some but allowed = to dorsiflex even more to work with the knees/hips to help absorb the = impacts of skiing. With the ankle reversed there is no flange on the anterior = side and will allow a lot of dorsiflexion. I heard this from an avid skier/amputee that uses this system to ski with. One other thought. If your patient is pleased with the movement of the college park foot, he should try the genesis II foot from Jim Smith Sales. I have used many = of these feet and am amazed at the amount of dorsiflexion it allows.

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I have been loyal to the air stance for 5 years, the seals and the 3-4 = times a year rebuild got old but it worked well, it was a good solid unit, I = have now started wearing the Mercury TT pylon from Endolite it is much = lighter and easier to maintain I have had it since June with no problems I an = using it with a mercury foot, this combination works well and with minimal maintenance should last a long time I had a new leg made with this same components, and am very happy with it.

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I highly recommend the Ossur Total Shock – there are 2 or 3 different = styles depending on the application. Not only is it a shock pylon, it is also = a torque absorber. Try it-your patients will like it!

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Randy Whiteside has developed a very nice and lightweight shock/torque absorbing pylon. His company is called Medventions. =20

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Blowout is a common problem with the Airstance and Seattle acknowledges = that fact but they honor their warranty. Try the Century XXII. It uses = solid elastomer bumpers. Avoid the ICON as it isn’t designed for high = activity (amazing!)for anyone over 110 lbs.

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There are a couple of things you may want to consider trying.

Using an endolite t/t shock pylon with the TruStep.
Using an Endolite t/t shock pylon with either the mercury or endloite = dyn resp foot with ankle. Using a century XXII shock pylon/adapter.

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Julie Bindi, CP

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