Saturday, May 28, 2022

Re: Question about salary

Bill Lifford

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Hi George,

> Bill – Re your prospective employee……isn’t it more important what the person has PRIOR

> to certification which speaks to the talent the individual brings with them? As is well

> known there is little correlation between certification and real talent for prosthetic

> work. What all prosthetic firms certainly want to offer the amputees who come to them are

> prostheses fitted and aligned by truly talented people. Should this not be the criterion in

> hiring? Should this not be even more so in the case of a ‘high profile’ firm such as

> yours? GeorgeB.

First of all, I don’t think it’s terribly appropriate that you forwarded my post from OandP-L to

AMP-L without asking me. This (the intent of my original post) is clearly not an issue that

concerns AMP-L, and I think you just used my post an an excuse to re-start discussion about a

key issue that concerns you. Everyone has a right to get paid for what they do for a living.

With all due respect, you should have just posted to AMP-L yourself if you decided you wanted to

revisit the talent issue. But, since you forwarded my original post here, as well as responded

directly to OandP-L when I asked for private responses only, I have chosen to respond to you

both privately and to the lists.

As you know, we have corresponded on the issue of “talent” and whether or not prosthetics is a

skill that can be learned by anyone or if a certain intuitive quality is necessitated.

It seems as though perhaps you misunderstood the nature of my inquiry… I am the employee in

question, and I most certainly do not own the facility or make decisions for it in any way

(though I would love to be more involved in it).

True, there are inadequate CP’s and good CP’s and also excellent non-certified prosthetists and

inadequate non-certs. My residency mentor was only certified for a year…. however, he had

been practicing for something like 25 years prior to attending school and becoming a CP. His

level of talent was extraordinary. Keen powers of observation and intuition as well as being a

deeply caring individual. Skilled with his hands as well, although by the time I met him he was

not doing too much in that regard (save for modification of casts).

But back to my original train of thought…

As far as what this employee (me) brings to the table in terms of pure talent, I don’t know. It

seems like I am doing just fine and am getting progressively better at what I do. I expect to

continue learning for at least the next 25 years or so! 🙂 I work with no supervision, though

I can ask questions and seek guidance if I feel I need to. My clients/patients seem (as a

whole) pretty happy with my services, and if one isn’t, I’ll do what it takes to make it right,

no questions asked. I stand by my work.

I don’t know how well this answers your question, but once again, you ask me to measure that

which we have not yet determined a way to accurately measure! As I’ve said before, your ideas

have a lot of merit but they need a little more “fleshing out” logistically before they will

come to fruition.

Bill Lifford, C.P.

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Hi George,

CITE>Bill – Re your prospective employee……isn’t

it more important what the person has PRIOR


to certification which speaks to the talent the individual brings

with them?  As is well


known there is little correlation between certification and real

talent for prosthetic


work.  What all prosthetic firms certainly want to offer the

amputees who come to them are


prostheses fitted and aligned by truly talented people.  Should

this not be the criterion in


hiring?  Should this not be even more so in the case of a ‘high

profile’ firm such as


yours?  GeorgeB.

First of all, I don’t think it’s terribly appropriate that you forwarded

my post from OandP-L to AMP-L without asking me.  This (the intent

of my original post) is clearly not an issue that concerns AMP-L, and I

think you just used my post an an excuse to re-start discussion about a

key issue that concerns you.  Everyone has a right to get paid for

what they do for a living.  With all due respect, you should have

just posted to AMP-L yourself if you decided you wanted to revisit the

talent issue.  But, since you forwarded my original post here, as

well as responded directly to OandP-L when I asked for private responses

only, I have chosen to respond to you both privately and to the lists.

As you know, we have corresponded on the issue of “talent” and whether

or not prosthetics is a skill that can be learned by anyone or if a certain

intuitive quality is necessitated.

It seems as though perhaps you misunderstood the nature of my inquiry…

I am the employee in question, and I most certainly do not own the facility

or make decisions for it in any way (though I would love to be more involved

in it).

True, there are inadequate CP’s and good CP’s and also excellent non-certified

prosthetists and inadequate non-certs.  My residency mentor was only

certified for a year…. however, he had been practicing for something

like 25 years prior to attending school and becoming a CP.  His level

of talent was extraordinary.  Keen powers of observation and intuition

as well as being a deeply caring individual.  Skilled with his hands

as well, although by the time I met him he was not doing too much in that

regard (save for modification of casts).

But back to my original train of thought…

As far as what this employee (me) brings to the table in terms of pure

talent, I don’t know.  It seems like I am doing just fine and am getting

progressively better at what I do.  I expect to continue learning

for at least the next 25 years or so!  🙂   I work with

no supervision, though I can ask questions and seek guidance if I feel

I need to.  My clients/patients seem (as a whole) pretty happy with

my services, and if one isn’t, I’ll do what it takes to make it right,

no questions asked.  I stand by my work.

I don’t know how well this answers your question, but once again, you

ask me to measure that which we have not yet determined a way to accurately

measure!  As I’ve said before, your ideas have a lot of merit but

they need a little more “fleshing out” logistically before they will come

to fruition.

Bill Lifford, C.P.


 


 


 

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